Cob Cactus

Cob Cactus

Succulentopedia

Echinocereus enneacanthus subsp. brevispinus (Strawberry Cactus)

Echinocereus enneacanthus subsp. brevispinus (Strawberry Cactus) is a cactus with cylindrical stems up to 3.3 feet (1 m) tall, that forms…


Euphorbia mammillaris

Indian Corn Cob is a succulent columnar, cactus-like plant studded with occasional spikes that resemble toothpicks. They are drought tolerant and need great drainage. Water once a week in the summer and up to once a month in the winter, allowing the soil to fully dry out between waterings. With plenty of space and sunlight, Indian Corn Cob can reach 1 foot tall and sprout new branches from its base.

Plant in containers with good drainage holes in potting soil appropriate for succulents and cacti. Provide with sun outside and bright light inside.

Form K. Andre CC BY 2.0 Stem Salicyna CC BY-SA 3.0 Form KM CC BY 2.0 Form Consultaplantas CC BY-SA 4.0 Close up Frank Vincentz CC BY 3.0 Form Frank Vincentz CC BY-SA 3.0

Euphorbia mammillaris (Corncob Cactus) – Succulent plants

Euphorbia mammillaris (Corncob Cactus) is a decorative, cactus-like succulent plant. It is a short-stemmed, dioecious shrublet producing a dense cluster. The stem is thick, erect, simple and ribbed, deep green, up to 35 cm tall and up to 6 cm in diameter. Usually, there are many club-like, lateral branches. The spines are the solitary sterile peduncles. They are occasionally present and scattered, thick, whitish and up to 1 cm long. The leaves are small, green and ephemeral. It produces yellow solitary cyathia at the tip of each stem in late winter to early summer.

Scientific Classification:

Family: Euphorbiaceae
Subfamily: Euphorbioideae
Tribe: Euphorbieae
Subtribe: Euphorbiinae
Genus: Euphorbia

Scientific Name: Euphorbia mammillaris
Synonyms: Often misspelled Euphorbia mamillaris
Common Names: Indian Corn Cob, Corn Cob Plant, Corncob Euphorbia, Corncob Cactus

How to grow and maintain Euphorbia mammillaris (Corncob Cactus) :

Light:
It prefers full to partial sunlight. Provides good sunlight at least 3-5 hours of the day, and turn it regularly so that your plant doesn’t begin to grow lopsided.

Soil:
It grows well in well-draining, gritty soil or cactus potting mix. They are not particular about soil pH, but they cannot tolerate wet soil.

Water:
You can allow the soil to dry out between each watering. Before watering the plant check underneath the pot through the drainage holes to see if the roots are dry. If so then add some water. Do not water too often to prevent overwatering, that can potentially kill it off.

Temperature:
It prefers an optimal temperatures of 60 degrees Fahrenheit – 85 degrees Fahrenheit / 16 degrees Celsius to 29 degrees Celsius.

Fertilizer:
Fertilize every two weeks with a diluted balanced liquid fertilizer during its growing season in the spring and summer. Avoid fertilizing your plant during the fall and winter months.

Propagation:
It can be easily propagated by cuttings. Take cutting in spring, which needs to be dried out for a couple of weeks in shade before potting. This can be tricky, because of the exuding sap. Rooting hormone is recommended with Euphorbias. Also can be propagated from seed, but they can be difficult to germinate.

Pests and Diseases:
Euphorbia may be susceptible to mealybugs, scale insects, occasionally spider mites.


Opuntia subulata cristata ‘Crested Eve’s Needle’

This small but strange variety of Eve’s Needle will stand out in any crowd of cacti.

Crested Eve’s Needle is a strange crested variety of Opuntia subulata. At maturity, it typically measures around 20 inches in height. The crested variety typically stays much smaller than normal Opuntia subulata, which can reach up to 13 feet tall. Instead, this odd plant focuses its growth on twisting and spreading out in an almost fan-like shape.

Opuntia subulata prefers full sun but can tolerate partial shade. It can handle a light frost but must be protected from freezing temperatures. Excess moisture can lead to root rot, so proper drainage is a must. It’s not uncommon for the plant to occasionally produce a normal branch, which is called a reversion. The reversion can be cut off to preserve the crested plant and propagated to grow a normal Opuntia subulata.

If you’re tired of the usual succulents and cacti, why not try something more exotic? Whether you prefer the woolly Peruvian Old Lady Cactus, the simplicity of the Baseball Plant, or the strange waves of Crested Eve’s Needle, be prepared to talk about your new and interesting plants. These weird looking succulents and cacti are certain to be the center of attention no matter where you plant them.

About Tarah Schwartz

Tarah Schwartz is a freelance writer living in Scottsdale, Arizona. Her life in the desert has inspired a passion for succulents and cacti.


Indian Cob Cactus

Family: Cactaceae (kak-TAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Echinopsis (ek-in-OP-sis) (Info)
Species: brevispinulosus
Synonym:Trichocereus brevispinulosus
Synonym:Trichocereus harrissima

Category:

Water Requirements:

Drought-tolerant suitable for xeriscaping

Average Water Needs Water regularly do not overwater

Sun Exposure:

Foliage:

Foliage Color:

Height:

Spacing:

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 °C (25 °F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 °C (30 °F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 °C (35 °F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 °C (40 °F)

Where to Grow:

Can be grown as an annual

Danger:

Plant has spines or sharp edges use extreme caution when handling

Bloom Color:

Bloom Characteristics:

Bloom Size:

Bloom Time:

Other details:

Soil pH requirements:

Patent Information:

Propagation Methods:

Allow cut surface to callous over before planting

From seed direct sow after last frost

Seed Collecting:

Allow unblemished fruit to ripen clean and dry seeds

Unblemished fruit must be significantly overripe before harvesting seed clean and dry seeds

Properly cleaned, seed can be successfully stored

Regional

This plant is said to grow outdoors in the following regions:


Euphorbia Species, Variegated Indian Corn Cob

Category:

Water Requirements:

Drought-tolerant suitable for xeriscaping

Sun Exposure:

Foliage:

Foliage Color:

Height:

Spacing:

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 °C (20 °F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 °C (25 °F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 °C (30 °F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 °C (35 °F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 °C (40 °F)

Where to Grow:

Danger:

Handling plant may cause skin irritation or allergic reaction

Bloom Color:

Bloom Characteristics:

Bloom Size:

Bloom Time:

Other details:

Soil pH requirements:

Patent Information:

Propagation Methods:

Allow cut surface to callous over before planting

Seed Collecting:

Regional

This plant is said to grow outdoors in the following regions:

Capistrano Beach, California

Gardeners' Notes:

On Jan 27, 2018, devinadalovely from sydney,
Australia wrote:

Hello, my Euphorbia is quite small and it's turning black from the stem upwards.
Any advice?
Thanks,

On Jan 23, 2015, poeciliopsis from Phoenix, AZ wrote:

Central Phoenix -- I find Euphorbia mammilaris variegata to be an easy Euphorb to grow outdoors in the ground here in Phoenix. I have two plants in the ground and others in pots. The in-ground plants have different micro-habitats with one having light partial shade and once-a-month water and no winter protection. It is slightly more healthy and grows faster than the other, which is in deep shade with slightly more water and is protected under a cold frame in winter.

On Jul 16, 2011, XerosOrchid from Scottsdale, AZ (Zone 9b) wrote:

I have been successful in growing this plant on the East side of the house, under the very spotty, very light shade of a Palo Verde tree, for the duration of the morning hours until 1PM (at June 21, summer solstice) the shade of the house moved over the plant for the rest of the afternoon. The plant is exposed to extreme dry heat at 110 degrees (and even above), and watered 1-2 days after the soil dries out. In winter, when temperatures drop to below 34 degrees at night, the plant is brought indoors and kept very dry under a skylight. Watering during the winter months (November-March) is cut back severely. Watering always occurs in the morning - never in the evening - with very hard well water.

Note: will not do well on a North-facing porc. read more h, too shady.

On Oct 31, 2008, BayAreaTropics from Hayward, CA wrote:

I'm trying this for the second time here in the bay area.The first time it rotted in it's pot one winter. This time I planted them in ground with other tender succulents.That's another point,I really have strong doubts it is hardy to 20f. I would guess like most tropical Euphorbia's, below freezing is close to certain death more or less. Planting a day before November isn't best timing!,but this is California where if it isn't hot or cold..then its always in the middle.

On Dec 30, 2006, palmbob from Acton, CA (Zone 8b) wrote:

Here in southern California this one doesnt' need much frost protection, but guess it depends on what the low gets to. So far, lows into the high to mid 20s don't affect this plant much. At new home in Acton, where got down to 22F this year, not a hint of cold damage, either. hardy! It is prone to rot when it's not growing much and overwhatered, but that seems to be a warm weather problem for me. EAsy plant here- great for pots and for landscaping as well. Tolerates a good deal of drought, but has its limits there, and have seen many kill their plants by never watering them. Handles full sun, here, too, even if over 110F. Not quite as reliable in a very shady situation, particularly if moist, or planted in soils that hold a lot of moisture.

On May 31, 2005, hanna1 from Castro Valley, CA (Zone 9a) wrote:

Needs frost protection in Phoenix. Min. temp. is 45F. Light shade. Keep drier in Winter. Propagation thru cuttings, seeds. Take branch in Summer, wash latex, let dry for a week & plant. Do not water the cutting until it shows a fair amount of growth. If temps are low, may not be any growth for several months. Be patient!
From South Africa (Little Karoo & Southern Cape area).
A great addition, it's color is great against the green variety.

On Aug 28, 2003, Happenstance from Northern California, CA wrote:

An elegant cousin with white-green coloration. Given outdoor direct sun it takes on a pinkish caste. It's a beauty!

Like all Euphorbia HANDLE WITH CARE, the latex/sap is dangerous and can cause skin rash, itching and general discomfort.


Watch the video: Doom-Shroom vs Gargantuar Zombie - Plants vs Zombies Battlez