Consolea

Consolea

Consolea is a genus of cacti, named after Italian botanist Michelangelo Console. It has 10 accepted species.

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Consolea Species, Road Kill Cactus, Sour Prickly Pear

Category:

Water Requirements:

Drought-tolerant suitable for xeriscaping

Sun Exposure:

Foliage:

Foliage Color:

Height:

Spacing:

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 °C (25 °F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 °C (30 °F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 °C (35 °F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 °C (40 °F)

Where to Grow:

Can be grown as an annual

Danger:

Plant has spines or sharp edges use extreme caution when handling

Bloom Color:

Bloom Characteristics:

Bloom Size:

Bloom Time:

Other details:

Soil pH requirements:

Patent Information:

Propagation Methods:

Allow cut surface to callous over before planting

From seed direct sow after last frost

Seed Collecting:

Allow unblemished fruit to ripen clean and dry seeds

Unblemished fruit must be significantly overripe before harvesting seed clean and dry seeds

Properly cleaned, seed can be successfully stored

Regional

This plant is said to grow outdoors in the following regions:

Gardeners' Notes:

On May 10, 2017, 2QandLearn from Menifee, CA (Zone 9a) wrote:

This plant LOOKS like an Opuntia, and has previously been CALLED 'Opuntia', --BUT-- it is NOT an Opuntia. It is instead: "Consolea rubescens": [ [email protected] ] So . . . Not sure if it is edible, or, not. (Another commentor said they were going to try eating it.)

". Sometimes freakishly flattened Cacti that are also lumped into the Opuntia genus by many nurseries and botanical gardens turn out to be *>ANOTHER GENUS

On Jun 4, 2016, FlaFlower from Titusville, FL (Zone 9b) wrote:

I also received this as a cutting a few years ago.
Now its over 6 foot with a good sturdy trunk base and out stretched arms. It bloomed for me this year for the first time in wonderful double orange flowers. Its no trouble requires nothing but full sun and dry. Mines in a raised bottomless bed 12 inches higher than the yard. I feel it could be considered thornless even the glockoids aren't bothersome being mostly subsunk in the pads

On Jun 4, 2014, caspiel from Brookfield, IL wrote:

I planted a small Road Kill in a container last spring and kept it outside all summer. In the fall, I transplanted it into a larger container. I brought it inside for the winter and, to my surprise, it survived. and thrived! It's almost 2 feet tall now and it's been back outside for the season for about two weeks (no more frost in the forecast!). A couple of the tall spikes and many of the smaller offshoots have started to wilt. I haven't over watered it. Any thoughts on why this might be happening??

On Aug 16, 2011, ogrejelly from Gilbert, AZ (Zone 9b) wrote:

Nice rich green plant with an almost cartoon like appearance. It looks like it becomes more tree as it grows. It takes the AZ sun well and it has made it through a 27 degree frost with just a cover. Slight damage to the top tips of the plant but nothing else. It appears dormant in the winter but grows pretty fast when the temps are in the 90's. Frost damage seemed to cause more branching later in the spring.

I have not seen it flower yet but will post a photo if I ever do.

On Jan 2, 2011, dustytrayl from Surprise, AZ wrote:

My Roadkill started as a four inch cute lil cactus. Unbeknownst to me, it is now a ten foot tree like behemouth!!
Road kill is named as such for the very flat pads that form the arms. Looks like they have been run over by a truck! I plan on trying them as a food source much as a prickly pear. Has anyone already tried this? If so, I would like to know your experience.

On Oct 27, 2004, Xenomorf from Phoenix, AZ (Zone 9b) wrote:

Palmbob,
When someone gave me a piece of this, and said it was 'roadkill cactus'. I thought they were serious that it had been run over by a car, thats how it looked, anyway. Until it rooted it, and gave it extra water, then it perked right up.
Later I found out that was the popular common name.

On Jul 25, 2004, palmbob from Acton, CA (Zone 8b) wrote:

Tree-like prickly pear cactus from the Caribbean Islands. Not sure why it's called Road Kill Cactus. anyone know?


Consolea Species, Cactus

Family: Cactaceae (kak-TAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Consolea (kon-SO-lee-uh) (Info)
Species: macracantha (mak-ra-KAN-tha) (Info)
Synonym:Consolea falcata
Synonym:Consolea microcarpa
Synonym:Consolea nashii
Synonym:Opuntia macracantha

Category:

Water Requirements:

Drought-tolerant suitable for xeriscaping

Average Water Needs Water regularly do not overwater

Sun Exposure:

Foliage:

Foliage Color:

Height:

Spacing:

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 °C (30 °F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 °C (35 °F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 °C (40 °F)

Where to Grow:

Danger:

Plant has spines or sharp edges use extreme caution when handling

Bloom Color:

Bloom Characteristics:

Bloom Size:

Bloom Time:

Other details:

Soil pH requirements:

Patent Information:

Propagation Methods:

Allow cut surface to callous over before planting

From seed direct sow after last frost

Seed Collecting:

Allow unblemished fruit to ripen clean and dry seeds

Unblemished fruit must be significantly overripe before harvesting seed clean and dry seeds

Properly cleaned, seed can be successfully stored

Gardeners' Notes:

On Aug 1, 2017, floramakros from Sacramento Valley, CA wrote:

In my experience the largest and most impressive species out of the 9 that make up this Opuntia related genus. Found mostly in Cuba and becoming increasingly endangered. Extremely rare in cultivation. I have 2 and nobody else I know has any. Quickly distinguishable from Opuntia by its very unusual growth habit. The pads on young seedlings continue to grow longer and become round, columnar and trunk-like, eventually forms a very tall tree with a crown of branching pads best described as looking like an Opuntia mated with a palm tree! Amazing beautiful one of a kind cactus.


CONSOLEA

https://www.cactuspro.com/photos_jpg/40/4046.jpg

• ETYMOLOGY
A genus honouring Michelangelo Console (1812-1897), Italian botanist, specializing in cacti, curator of the Botanical Garden of Palermo, Italy. Portrait is unknown.
• DESCRIPTION
A genus of treelike plants with one or several very spiny cylindrical trunks, bearing lateral or terminal, sometimes dense branches, with suborbicular to elongated or ellipsoid cladodes, with margins often curved, with smooth or reticulate surface. Areoles having hairs, glochids and spines. Spines very variable, sometimes absent.
Flowers diurnal, self sterile, rather small, changing colour, yellow, orange, red, pollinated by ants (Crematogaste ashmeadi), also probably by bees and hummingbirds. Fruits oblong and fleshy. Seeds straw-coloured, strongly compressed laterally, with a funicular envelope densely covered with trichomes.
• HABITAT
The genus Consolea grows in the Caribbean islands, in dry forests with a warm climate, sometimes on reliefs. We also find it in Florida (USA), close to the sea, near mangrove swamps, on rocky outcrops, from the sea level up to 50 m in altitude.
• DISTRIBUTION
Caribbean islands: Bahamas Islands, Cayman Islands, Cuba, Haiti, Jamaica, Puerto Rico, Dominican Republic, USA (Florida).

Currently 9 recognised species (Negron-Ortiz, 2007) + 3 subspecies:
– Consolea corallicola* Small 1930
– Consolea falcata* (Ekm. & Werderm.) F.M.Knuth 1935
– Consolea macracantha* (Griseb.) A.Berger 1926
– Consolea millspaughii* (Britton) A.Berger 1926
– Consolea millspaughii subsp. caymanensis* Areces 2000
– Consolea moniliformis* (L.) A.Berger 1926
– Consolea moniliformis subsp. guantanamana Areces 1996
– Consolea nashii* (Britton) A.Berger 1926
– Consolea nashii subsp. gibarensis Areces 1996
– Consolea picardae* (Urban) Areces 2000
– Consolea rubescens* (Salm-Dyck ex DC.) Lem. 1862
– Consolea spinosissima* (Mill.) Lem. 1862

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Planting

From Early Spring TO Early Spring

Growing Long Spine Cactus on a sunny location allows the plant to thrive and fruit. Long Spine Cactus is a tropical plant so it loves warm exposure. However, it can withstand temperatures down to 14 F (-10 C) but in areas with harsh winters it is good to plant it on a sheltered spot, near a wall or tall tree to protect it from cold drafts and fluctuation in temperature. If you’re living in a cooler climate, growing prickly pear cactus in a container is the better option for you as it can only be grown on the ground where winter temperature remains above 14 F (- 10 C).


Watch the video: OPUNTİA CONSOLEA RUBESCENS. Kaktüs Tür Tanıtımları