Bulbs - Ebook

Bulbs - Ebook

Bulbs 1

Interesting ebook that introduces us to the world of bulbous plants by describing in 10 articles some of the most beautiful and famous bulbous plants: Agapanthus, Garlic, Amarillis, Calla, Cyclamen, Crocus, Dahlia, Freesia and Hemerocallis. For each of these plants the main characteristics are described, the type of care they need, and the main parasites that afflict these species.

Bulbs 2

Bulbi 2 continues the in-depth study of our website on bulbous plants and offers ten new articles dedicated to this fantastic world. In Bulbi 2 you will find the following items: amarillis, potted bulbs, lily, gladioli, iris, muscari, narcissus, propagation of bulbs, buttercup, vegetative rest. Some articles are entirely devoted to a bulbous plant species while others deal with topics closely related to these plants.



Spring bulbs, when and how to plant them?

Spring bulbs? Here is everything you need to know to have a flower garden in spring! There is nothing more beautiful than colorful and fragrant flowers that brighten up the days, that's why, the best solution is to plant bulbs that remain protected under the ground and then begin to bloom when it's hot. Let's see which are the most beautiful spring bulbs and which combinations are particularly interesting for an excellent flowering.


Seeds and bulbs for a beautiful garden with little expense

When the family budget is no longer enough to meet everyday expenses, let alone a few euros remain for "superfluous" expenses ... What to do, give up the hobby of gardening, and therefore its very pleasant load of well-being, relaxation and cheerfulness? Absolutely not, as it is one of the great pleasures of life! However plants and flowers can also be had with a variable cost between zero and a few tens of euros: here's how.

From zero to 50 euros

They cost zero euros, for example, the cuttings given away from neighbors, friends and relatives when pruning: considering that, depending on the different species of plants, it can be pruned practically all year round, every moment is good to get new plants, which only ask for a jar with a little 'of sand mixed with a handful of soil.

You spend from 2 to 10 euros for the seed sachets of the various flowering plants, annual, biennial and perennial, or garden plants: usually many plants are obtained to fill a flowerbed of at least 6 square meters, or a dozen standard balcony boxes. In exchange for so much cheapness, you just need to have the patience to carefully follow the seedbed first and then the newborn seedlings, until they have reached the size with which they are normally sold in jars (about 10-15 cm in height). But the satisfaction for having obtained them at home, starting from a tiny seed, will be infinitely greater, together with the joy for the considerable savings made.

Within 20 euros you can buy a pack of grass seeds 1 kg, which generally allows you to sow from 30 to 60 square meters, depending on the type of mixture it contains. If you sow, the only additional expense will be for the purchase of the specific fertilizer for lawns.

As for the bulbs, on average, a 10-piece pack of normal bulbs (not rare varieties or novelties of the year) costs 6-8 euros, but there are also garden packs of 20, 50 or 100 pieces with which it is possible to make a considerable saving , in proportion, thus filling a small garden with colors at a cost of less than 50 euros. Not to mention the long duration: especially in the garden, bulbs, tubers, corms and rhizomatous roots can give rich blooms for at least 5-6 years and, when they tend to run out, just extract the roots and divide them into various portions, replanting them immediately afterwards in different points of the garden. You will thus obtain a natural multiplication of the blooms at no cost.

Seeds and sowing

Sowing is one of the oldest and most enjoyable practices in the world in gardening. At the time of purchase, read the sachet label carefully: check in particular if the species and variety chosen is suitable for your sun / shade conditions and your geographical area based on the area in fact the sowing time varies, anticipated in mild climate areas and delayed in the Alpine arc, where the cycle may become short enough to sacrifice some flowering.

Then check if it is possible to do the sowing in seedbeds, with subsequent transplanting in the ground or in pots, or if it is a species that must be sown directly in the home, in which case the subsequent operations are simpler.

Finally, read well the Expiration date: prefer sachets with the earliest possible date so, if you decide not to sow the whole sachet, you can save the seeds for the following year. In this case, remember to put the bag tightly closed with a clothespin, in a metal box in a place that remains cool even in summer (for example in the cellar).

For sowing, if the seedbed is needed or if it is possible to anticipate the times with respect to planting at home, a rigid plastic tray or tray with 5-6 cm high edges (excellent ones that contain carrots packed at the supermarket), a little sifted river sand to remove impurities and a handful of fertile earth for each tray. Better to sow following the rows drawn with a ruler: it will be easier to carry out the following operations.

Keep the tray in a warm place and always keep thehumidity of the substrate vaporizing every day with the pump. When the shoots have released the first two true leaves (the very first pair of leaves is "false": they are called cotyledonary leaves and are used only to give birth to the seedling), remove the most stunted plants with a pencil.

When they have produced 5-6 leaves, each one should be carefully placed in a 8-10 cm diameter jar (this operation is called "repackaging") Pending the final planting, which will take place after about a month, compatibly with the outside temperature.

There sow directly at home it is even simpler, because the repatching operation is completely skipped.

The bulbs: even simpler

Bulbs, tubers, corms or rhizomes they are different from each other at the botanical level, but their function is always the same: to store sufficient reserve substance to guarantee, during the summer, a rich flowering. For all these types of roots the same advice applies in the choice and planting.

Prefer healthy bulbs, without mold, rot or dark patches to the touch they must appear firm and robust the bigger they are, the better the flowering will be. Take a good look at them at the time of purchase, because the expiry date is not indicated on the package for this type of plants.

However, the place of planting is often indicated, whether it is garden plants or even pot plants: a vase bulb lives very well even in the open ground, but not vice versa, unless you give it a very large container. A good indicator in this sense can also be the maximum height: it is difficult for species larger than 60 cm to perform well in pots, because to flower they need to sink the adventitious roots (thin roots emitted by the bulb or tuber). deep into the garden soil.

The time of planting varies according to the flowering period: in autumn (in October in the South, in November in the Alps) for bulbs with winter or spring flowering, in spring (in March in the South, in May in the Alps) for those with summer flowering. However, you can decide to plant them in scales, to obtain staggered flowering over time: the last useful time for planting will be December and June respectively.

For the plantation, in pots or in the garden, there are four indications to be respected: drainage must always be perfect, by means of a layer of expanded clay or gravel, the depth and distance between one bulb and another must be double the height and the diameter of the bulb the apex must always be facing upwards if it does not rain enough, it is necessary to wet regularly but without exceeding.

Spring bulbs go fertilized only after the withering, until the leaves wither by themselves the summer ones instead during the whole phase of growth of the plant and production of flowers.

A beautiful lawn from seed

Sowing the turf by yourself is much cheaper than laying a clod of grass which, among other things, requires skilled labor. When choosing seeds, first consider the geographical area and the exposure of your land: there are specific mixtures for Mediterranean areas, as well as for areas in the shade or in full sun.

Then consider the use what you will do with the turf: the ornamental mixtures are beautiful to look at but less resistant to trampling, unlike playing fields, which resist even the races of… “budding footballers”.


Other related news: Bulbs

  • Needs
    • light
    • Bulbs for sunny areas
    • Bulbs for partial shade areas
    • Bulbs for shady areas
    • Bulbs for bright places
    • Bulbs for dry soil
    • Bulbs for moist soil
    • Bulbs for wet ground
    • Bulbs for acidic soil
    • temperature
    • Bulbs not tolerant of cold
    • Bulbs resistant to short frosts
    • Bulbs resistant to temperatures just below zero
    • Bulbs resistant to intense cold
  • Flowering
    • color
    • White flower bulbs
    • Pink flower bulbs
    • Red flower bulbs
    • Purple flower bulbs
    • Blue flower bulbs
    • Green flower bulbs
    • Yellow flower bulbs
    • Orange flower bulbs
    • flowering period
    • Bulbs with flower in spring
    • Bulbs with flower in summer
    • Bulbs with flower in autumn
    • Bulbs with flower in winter
  • dimension
    • Bulbs up to 50 cm
    • Bulbs up to 1 m
    • Bulbs up to 1.5m
    • Bulbs up to 3 m
    • Bulbs up to 30 m
  • Poise
    • bearing
    • Bulbs with columnar habit
    • Tree bulbs
    • Ball bulbs
    • Climbing bulbs
  • other
    • Bulbs that can be grown in pots
    • Ground cover bulbs
    • Evergreen bulbs
    • Bulbs that bear fruit
    • Good smelling bulbs

    Buttercup - Ranunculus asiaticus

    Discover the characteristics of the buttercup, its origins, cultivation methods, the care it needs and much more on our page!

    Thrush

    Are you ready to find out all about lily of the valley, a herbaceous plant with wonderful characteristics, rustic and ideal both in the garden and in pots? Read our in-depth analysis

    Amarillis

    Plant with long ribbon leaves, light green in color, summer flowers, grouped in pairs or singles, trumpet-shaped, very large

    Crocus - Crocus vernus

    Elegant appearance and bright colors - this is what the crocus looks like on the outside. It is a small, slightly fleshy plant with charm and certainly able to charm everyone here

    Flowers bulbs

    Decorating a flowerbed with bulb flowers can be an excellent solution, able to greatly enhance our garden. The flowers of the bulbous plants in fact give off a unique charm and there is one

    Freesia - Freesia

    Freesia is a perennial herb of African origin. Discover the characteristics of this plant and learn how to grow it, take care of it and give it the attention it needs

    Lily - Lilium

    The lily or lilium is the generic name with which a series of very fascinating and characteristic bulbous plants are generally indicated. Generally these bulbous plants are not very large and reach a height

    Narcissus, Tazetta - Narcissus

    The narcissus is a beautiful bulbous plant that blooms at the end of winter, ideal for growing both in the garden and on the terrace. Find out how to grow it by reading our cards.

    Tulip

    Tulips are one of the most suitable bulbs to be grown for the decoration of flower beds, gardens, pots and parks. discover their characteristics with our insights

    Dalia, Giorgina - Dahlia

    For bulbous lovers here is a very interesting insight into dahlias to get to know these plants better and learn how to grow them

    Hemerocallis - Hemerocallis

    Hemerocallis is a splendid bulbous plant known above all for the beauty of its flowers, which appear with bright colors in the late summer period.

    Liatris spikes - Liatris spicata

    Liatris spicata, also known as spiked liatris is a bulbous plant known for its tall flowering spikes that appear in late summer.

    Agapanthus - Agapanthus

    Agapanthus is a bulbous plant that can reach considerable size, blooms in the summer season and has very decorative flowers of different colors.

    Aconite - Aconitum vulparia

    Aconitus is a highly toxic bulbous that produces mainly blue but also yellow, white and lilac summer flowers clustered in long spikes.

    Eremoro - Eremurus

    The eremurus is a plant with a tuberous root that produces particular spike inflorescences during the hot season.

    Trillium grandiflorum

    Trillium grandiflorum is a rhizomatous perennial plant that in spring produces large flowers of different colors, from white to pink to orange.
    • Needs
      • light
      • Bulbs for sunny areas
      • Bulbs for partial shade areas
      • Bulbs for shady areas
      • Bulbs for bright places
      • Bulbs for dry soil
      • Bulbs for moist soil
      • Bulbs for wet ground
      • Bulbs for acidic soil
      • temperature
      • Bulbs not tolerant of cold
      • Bulbs resistant to short frosts
      • Bulbs resistant to temperatures just below zero
      • Bulbs resistant to intense cold
    • Flowering
      • color
      • White flower bulbs
      • Pink flower bulbs
      • Red flower bulbs
      • Purple flower bulbs
      • Blue flower bulbs
      • Green flower bulbs
      • Yellow flower bulbs
      • Orange flower bulbs
      • flowering period
      • Bulbs with flower in spring
      • Bulbs with flower in summer
      • Bulbs with flower in autumn
      • Bulbs with flower in winter
    • dimension
      • Bulbs up to 50 cm
      • Bulbs up to 1 m
      • Bulbs up to 1.5m
      • Bulbs up to 3 m
      • Bulbs up to 30 m
    • Poise
      • bearing
      • Bulbs with columnar habit
      • Tree bulbs
      • Ball bulbs
      • Climbing bulbs
    • other
      • Bulbs that can be grown in pots
      • Ground cover bulbs
      • Evergreen bulbs
      • Bulbs that bear fruit
      • Good smelling bulbs

      The best known of this category are: allium, cyclamen, crocus, fritillaria, galanthus, hyacinth, leucojum, narcissus, muscari, ornithogalus, scille, iris hollandica and tulips.

      We also keep in mind that some bulbous (such as muscari) tend to produce leaves already in autumn (if they have been in the ground for a long time) and they have no problem with overcoming extreme cold and then flowering regularly. If the temperatures in our area were really low, we can possibly think of mulching the soil with leaves, straw or other suitable material.
      The bulbous with summer flowering, they are usually planted in spring, after the end of the frosts.

      The most common are: agapanthus, amaryllis belladonna, tuberous begonias, calla, canna indica, crocosmia, dahlia, freesia, gloriosa, gladioli, lilium, nerine, tulbaghia, hemerocallis, gloxinia.

      Those with autumn flowering must be planted around July. Among these we remember the colchicum, some autumn crocus (including those known for the production of saffron), dahlie, hemerocallis.

      It is important to point out that for some geophytes in reality it can be more elastic. For example, the freesias should be planted in autumn, but in the Center-North it is advisable to insert them in the spring. We will do the same thing with all spring flowering bulbs that are very sensitive to low temperatures.

      If we grow bulbous plants in pots we can have even more freedom. Many of these plants can be forced and therefore, with a minimum of skill, we can choose in which period to make them bloom. Classically in the middle of winter, jars with daffodils, hyacinths, crocuses and snowdrops at their peak are sold.
      The bulbs can be used inside the flower beds to create splashes of color or to enrich areas by reproducing their natural habitus.

      What is very important in any case is to avoid too much regularity in the system. This would make the whole artificial and inelegant.

      In flowerbeds and borders it is always good to place the lower bulbous plants in the foreground and the higher ones on the back. If you have to mix similar types in height, it is better to mix them previously, and then drop them randomly on the ground. We will insert them exactly at that point. This will help us create a more natural and spontaneous atmosphere.

      If we decide to insert the bulbous plants in a lawn or in an informal area, it will always be good to avoid planting them too isolated. This is not decorative at all and generally conveys an idea of ​​loneliness. To have an optimal effect instead it is good to reproduce what is seen in nature: usually the bulbs grow in groups. So let's make at least 5 holes with the planter in a not too tidy way and insert them inside, then cover with a bit of soil and compact well.

      For this type of use, crocus, snowdrops, muscari, colchicum and some very low varieties (and perhaps with more flower heads) of daffodils and tulips are excellent. If the exposure and climate conditions are optimal for them (and the soil is rightly rich) it is possible that they will begin to naturalize and spread autonomously in the area.

      If we want to insert these flowers among the grass, let's remember to postpone the first mowing of the lawn for at least a month to give the leaves the possibility to dry up and the plant to recover its strength to return to produce stems in the coming years.
      As a rule of thumb we can say that the bulbs must be inserted at a depth equal to 3 times their length. The smaller ones have to stay more on the surface, the bigger ones with more reserve substances are planted deeper. However, it is not necessary to be overly precise because when the roots sprout these will help in correct positioning. On the other hand, it is very important, both in pots and in the ground, that, even if very close, they do not touch each other. This could in fact cause the onset of rot.
      Permanently planted bulbs (especially rustic ones) usually don't need a lot of care.

      At the end of flowering it is very important to remove the terminal part of the stem to prevent the plant from trying to go to seed. It would be a useless effort that would lead to wasting resources that would otherwise accumulate underground to be used for new blooms in the following years.

      One of the few disadvantages of bulbous plants is represented by the need to keep the leaves until they have naturally dried. Sometimes the temptation to cut to give the garden a neater look is really strong. However, we try to resist if we want our bulbs to keep for years and years and maybe even manage to reproduce by giving us some cloves to separate.

      Some of these plants, such as dahlias, hyacinths, and some irises, may need supports to withstand wind or heavy rain. Over time we will learn which of our plants want support. Generally speaking, they are very tall and / or with very voluminous flowers.
      Not all geophytes can always remain in the ground. For example, some delicate tulip hybrids, dahlias, cane indica absolutely need to be extracted. They must spend the winter in a dry and frost-free environment.

      They should be placed in wooden boxes with the roots upwards so that any residual moisture drips away from the stems. Once dry, they will be covered with insulating material. Pine bark, vermiculite, straw or even bits of Styrofoam work very well.
      The bulbs multiply naturally by division forming new bulbs on the sides of the mother bulb at the end of the season. The large mother bulb can continue to live or dissolve after flowering. The bulbs can be pulled out of the ground and divided at the end of the season and then replanted to a depth of about three times their size.

      A small number of bulbous plants, for example lilies, form tiny bulbs, called bulbs, on the underground stem. From each of which a new plant can develop. Others may also be produced in correspondence of the leaf axil.

      Again the lilies (and also the fritillaries) can be multiplied by multiplying the scales. We proceed in the fall. Some scales are detached from the bulb, one at a time, pulling them outwards until they break at the base. What remains can be safely returned to the ground.

      We put the flakes in a bag with fungicidal powder. We then insert some humid vermiculite and store at a temperature of about 20 20C. After about 8 weeks it will be possible to observe the birth of small bulbils at the base of the scales. All this must be planted in 8-9 cm pots or in boxes with rich but well drained soil. Within a season, the flakes will dry out and the bulbs will increase in volume. They can then be permanently planted. They usually bloom from the second year on.
      Lily cruise they are red insects about 6 mm long. They feed on the leaves of lilies and fritillaries. If their work is massive, the bulb will end up weakening and will never come back to bloom.

      Gladiolus thrips they are insects with a slender body, about 2 mm long, blackish. They cause spots and discolorations on the leaves and feed on the inside of the bud.

      Basal rot it affects many types of different bulbous plants and therefore it is necessary to pay close attention by adjusting the irrigations accordingly and disinfecting all the cuts after making some divisions,

      It causes rot in the underground part.


      The three best bulbs for every season

      Although there are different types depending on the season, here are the three best and most popular, namely the tulip, the narcissus and the iris.

      Tulip: one of the best known and most appreciated varieties, the tulip is a simple but impressive flower. Characterized by intense green foliage, stiff and fleshy, with large and colorful cup-shaped flowers, from red to purple, up to yellow and pure white. It is an autumn bulb and is suitable for both cultivation in the ground and in pots. It needs light, but also prefers shady areas.

      Narcissus: as the tulip is an autumn bulb, which blooms in spring. In addition to being beautiful and refined, it stands out for its yellow or white flowers called trumpets and for its light and delicate scent. They love light and semi-shaded areas, as long as they are sheltered from the wind.

      Iris: iris is the most common flowering bulb of the spring season. What characterizes this variant is the delicate and pleasant scent, and the foliage with an intense blue-green color. It is an elegant flower, perfect for decorating the garden or balcony.


      The ideal season has arrived for planting flower bulbs, plant species that guarantee a garden full of bright colors and shades. The operation itself is very simple, but you are sure you know how to insure plants all the necessary care and precautions? Here then are the tricks for planting the bulbs of flowering species.

      Autumn or spring bulbs?
      Flowering bulbs are divided into autumn and spring based on period in which they bloom. The bulbs of the autumn species must be placed in the ground in spring, vice versa, the bulbs of the spring flowering plants must be buried during the autumn. This foresight allows the plants to adapt to the soil, emit roots and absorb as many nutrients as possible from the soil to strengthen and ensure spectacular blooms.

      Bulbs in pots or in flower beds?
      THE bulbs flowers can be planted directly in flower beds as in pots. If placed in the garden, the bulbous they represent a wonderful decoration capable of making green spaces less formal and giving intense notes of color, especially if arranged in groups. Arrange the crocuses, tulips or ornamental garlic in the flower beds.
      Instead, cultivated in pots bulbous they are splendid examples for indoors, to adorn the window sills, or outdoors, to embellish the terrace planter with color.
      All the bulb plants they can be grown in containers, the important thing is to ensure they have enough soil to develop their roots. The most classic are obviously cyclamen, perfect for coloring balconies during the cold periods of the year.
      How to choose the location of the bulbs in the flower beds

      Before burying i bulbs it is necessary to take into consideration their specific microclimatic needs (muscari, narcissus and ornithogalli, for example, they should preferably be placed in full sun) in addition to the characteristics of the plants themselves (lilies of the valley and glorious are poisonous plants, a place not frequented by children or pets is recommended for them).
      Try to follow a "zig-zag" line in the arrangement of the bulbs on the ground, this type of plant serves to make the composition and all of the flowering species they will look more natural.

      How are bulbs planted?
      THE bulbs they should be placed in loose or medium-textured soils to allow excess water to move away quickly and avoiding the root system from suffering from water stagnation.
      Fix each bulb in a small hole large enough to contain it completely and, as a general rule suggests, twice the height of the bulb itself.
      Enter i bulbs with the tip pointing upwards and cover them with the earth obtained from the excavation after having well chopped it up, then wet the ground.


      What to do with withered hyacinth and other bulbs

      During the winter the hyacinths
      specially forced to brighten the houses in the most stingy period of blooms, they are the joy of many aficionados. After flowering, which usually lasts about a week, cut off the withered stem at the base and moderately wet the earth until the leaves remain green and continue to perform photosynthesis. For those who raise plants in the apartment, green foliage can also be of interest and be very decorative.

      DO NOT CUT THE LEAVES .

      It is the phase in which the bulb receives the nutrients useful for its growth, let the leaves complete their life cycle until they begin to yellow. About two months after the end of flowering, when they are completely dry, cut them and remove the bulb from the earth before placing it in a paper bag and placing it in a cardboard box to be placed in a dark and well-ventilated place until it is time to put it. planted from late summer to autumn. If you have a garden or a terrace, you can plant the bulbs in a hole or in a pot on the bottom of which you have placed a draining layer, containing good soil mixed with sand. Plant only healthy bulbs that are firm to the touch, as they are forced plants, they will hardly be able to give new flowers the following spring as they must first have time to regain more natural growth rates.

      from Vivere Country March 2015

      Apply the same procedure for all the other withered bulbs too!

      The extra idea:

      do not throw away the dry foliage, especially the fine one of muscari and daffodils, it is perfect for making a cozy bed for the eggs of Easter decorations, the period in which they must be cut, in fact, often coincides with Easter!


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