How to care for an orchid plant after it blooms

How to care for an orchid plant after it blooms

If you were given a Phalaenopsis orchid around Valentine's Day, chances are its bloom cycle has finished. This is merely the beginning of a new journey and an essential part of caring for orchids. As noted in our previous post , Phalaenopsis orchids go through a resting phase called dormancy after blooming. Dormancy typically lasts for six to nine months but may vary from plant to plant.

Content:
  • What to Do With an Orchid After the Flowers Fall Off?
  • Orchid care: How to make houseplant bloom and keep it 'healthy' - 'it's important'
  • Do Orchids Grow Back and Rebloom After Flowers Fall Off?
  • Orchid: Ultimate Flower Guide
  • HOW TO GROW ORCHIDS
  • My Orchid is Not Blooming
  • DIY Network Blog: Made + Remade
  • How to Care for Phalaenopsis Orchids After They Bloom
  • Caring for Phalaenopsis Orchids
  • How to Make Your Orchid Last
WATCH RELATED VIDEO: How to get your Phalaenopsis orchids to flower again

What to Do With an Orchid After the Flowers Fall Off?

With an array of exotic colours and fancy blooms, orchids come in all manner of shapes and sizes. Plus, Graham gives us all the tips to keep your orchids in tip-top health and get the most out of your beautiful flowering display. As orchids start to produce their exotic, sometimes quixotic, blooms in our homes and gardens, you can have them flowering for months, year after year, if you treat them right.

They've thrived for tens of millions of years in the wildest of places, meaning their exotic, delicate-looking petals are extremely tough. So don't toss those little potted moths after they have finished flowering as you would bin cut flowers. They will flower again. Or, put other orchids in your garden for an annual show that will light up your winter days. Orchids grow all over the world, except Antarctica - but the most dazzling are in Asia and Australia. These showy clusters of flowers on long stems look lovely in a north-facing garden under dappled light.

Hang them in a tree or grow in a pot of orchid mix. Or, put the pretty little natives D. They require heat and moisture when growing in summer and autumn, and cooler, drier conditions when growth is finished and flowers shine in winter or early spring. Large sprays of big, bold, waxy flowers emerge from long strappy leaves in winter or early spring. Many are Australian natives so are quite cold tolerant and often flower in summer.

As they are semi-terrestrial they thrive best in containers with an orchid mix, or a rich but very loose organic mix. They're best grown outdoors but, if you're prone to frosts, bring them indoors in winter where they can get indirect light form the north or west. Some cymbidiums are epiphytic and grow on trees.

Others are lithophytic and grow on damp rocks. But most are semi-terrestrial, meaning outside their natural environment they must grow in a special medium in pots. Their roots operate as a support structure, rather than a straw for nutrients, and need a very open medium so their roots can breathe between watering. Royale Orchids nursery recommends:. Looking like they're grown in a lolly shop, these showy, fragrant, frilly flowers are best known for the classic corsage or buttonhole bloom.

As slow-growing epiphytes, you can grow these outside attached to trees in a warm, sheltered position with bright, indirect sunlight, or mounted on a board. But if you get frosts, put them in pots in an orchid-growing medium and bring indoors in winter. The flowers last for weeks and can surprise you by blooming twice a year. Their large cascades of moth-like flowers have made them the most popular indoor orchids in recent years. But often they get tossed with the flowers fade. Instead, save them for another year but cutting off the flower stalks at the base and putting them in a spot that mimics the tropics - warm during the day and much cooler at night, as well as maintaining humidity.

The arching sprays of these dense gatherings of flowers have been compared to a flutter of butterflies. They like a warm, humid but shady spot with just a couple of hours of sun a day.

Grow in a pot of orchid mix or wrap around a tree. If indoors, let light come from the north or east. These are enchanting in your garden or home - and you can probably get a slipper with colours and patterns to suit our interior decor, coming in freckles and stripes and a spectacularly wide range of colours. Most are terrestrial, so put in a pot of orchid mix. They thrive in subtropical and temperate regions in a sheltered, shady, humid spot. Inside, gie them a well-lit spot.

Establish the right conditions and this fascinating orchid with its purple clam-shaped flowers will bloom all year. These epiphytes are best grown in temperate climates, in bright, indirect light. If you can't get it quite right you'll still have these fragrant flowers from late spring to early summer.

Grow in orchid mix or mount on a board to attach to a tree trunk or a tree fern. After the flowers drop from the orchid you have three choices : leave the flower spike or stem intact, cut it back to a node, or remove it entirely.

Remove the flower spike entirely by clipping it off at the base of the plant. This is definitely the route to take if the existing stem starts to turn brown or yellow. Imagine a beautiful epiphytic Cymbidium 'White Rabbit' dangling from a tree in your garden or nestled in a stump on your balcony.

It can be done! But it's not possible for all cymbidiums. So use northern Australian cymbidiums, which are epiphytes and spend their lives hanging from trees, deriving all the moisture and nutrients they need from the air, rain or plant debris such as leaf litter.

Popular varieties among home gardeners include the giant boat-lip orchid C. Simply find a fork in a tree or stump, pack it out with sphagnum moss, press the base of the orchid into it and tie it with soft twine or old, cut-up pantyhose. After a couple of months, once the orchid's roots have 'taken', remove tie. It's illegal to remove orchids from the wild, so make sure you only purchase them from licensed growers.

How to double or triple your orchids for free. What to do with the trunk of dead trees. Cymbidium 'White Rabbit' Sue Ferris. Tree orchids Getty. Boat orchids Getty. Corsage orchid Getty. Moth orchids Getty. Dancing ladies orchid Getty. Lady slipper orchids Getty. Cockleshell orchid Getty. Sue Ferris. Get more from Better Homes and Gardens.


Orchid care: How to make houseplant bloom and keep it 'healthy' - 'it's important'

With proper care, you can enjoy the splendid flowers of your Phalaenopsis for a long time, over 3 months. And did you know that when your Phalaenopsis has stopped flowering, it can be encouraged to flower again after a break of 6 months to recover? We have put together a number of tips to help you enjoy your flowering Phalaenopsis for as long as possible. These tips will also tell you how to stimulate your orchid to flower several times. This orchid requires a lot of light but does not tolerate direct sunlight, and certainly not in the summer months.

Orchids are the largest family of flowering plants in the world, with more than 25, Epiphytic orchids grow in the canopies of trees.

Do Orchids Grow Back and Rebloom After Flowers Fall Off?

Question: Not one of my orchids has rebloomed in over a year. I buy them in flower and they look beautiful for weeks, then they never bloom again. A few minor adjustments should bring them back into flower. Try turning the thermostat down by at least 10 degrees when you go to bed. Many of your other houseplants will thank you for this as well. Courtesy of GrowingWisdom. All the popular orchids - those you find at florist shops and orchid shows - will grow quite happily on most windowsills. Others, such as the cattleyas, need lots of light and a south window. In fact, many cattleyas and cymbidiums are at their best when their leaves are a little on the yellow side; dark green leaves mean they need more sun. When everything is to their liking, many phalaenopsis will bloom twice a year.

Orchid: Ultimate Flower Guide

Thank you so much. Your articles are extensive and comprehensive. The topics are very well explained with concrete examples. I find that they contain very helpful information. Thank you for the thorough information.

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HOW TO GROW ORCHIDS

Jump to navigation. With tens of thousands of different species growing on every continent except Antarctica, orchids make up one of the largest families of flowering plants. Once a luxury for the wealthy, orchids now enjoy more widespread popularity. While each species is a little different, there are general guidelines that you can follow when caring for your beloved orchid. The following tips are from orchid specialist Marilyn H. How much light does an orchid need?

My Orchid is Not Blooming

Rocket Farms specializes in novelty phalaenopsis as well as a variety of orchid gardens. We meet with breeders from around the world and are active in the development of new orchid varieties. Rocket Farms has introduced innovative novelty varieties in the U. By being the first company to successfully ship orchids from Asia via ocean container, Rocket Farms was able to introduce orchids with a color mix that is the opposite of most growers. The response has been incredible! Consumers love all the new colors and patterns. Best if allowed to almost dry out between watering.

Monopodial orchids grow in height with each new leaf (like a palm tree); As a general rule, repot plants every two years after flowering and when new.

DIY Network Blog: Made + Remade

Weed 'n' Feed. Share your gardening joy! Moth orchids Phalaenopsis spp are beautiful and very popular orchids that are native to forests in tropical Asia. Often given as gifts, they have stunning and long lasting flowers that come in a wide range of gorgeous colours including pink, mauve, yellow and white.

How to Care for Phalaenopsis Orchids After They Bloom

RELATED VIDEO: HOW TO TAKE CARE OF DENDROBIUM ORCHIDS AFTER BLOOM / DENDROBIUM ORCHIDS CARE

Facebook Youtube Instagram Linkedin. About P. Allen Smith. Although they may appear exotic, Phalaenopsis orchids are easy to care for and these days, easy to come by. I know that with a little TLC the plant will flower again and there is no such thing as having too many orchids.

Orchid flowers cover a range of unusual shapes, varying sizes and a rainbow of colors. Once blooms finish flowering, they fall off plants to leave bare stems in their place.

Caring for Phalaenopsis Orchids

With an array of exotic colours and fancy blooms, orchids come in all manner of shapes and sizes. Plus, Graham gives us all the tips to keep your orchids in tip-top health and get the most out of your beautiful flowering display. As orchids start to produce their exotic, sometimes quixotic, blooms in our homes and gardens, you can have them flowering for months, year after year, if you treat them right. They've thrived for tens of millions of years in the wildest of places, meaning their exotic, delicate-looking petals are extremely tough. So don't toss those little potted moths after they have finished flowering as you would bin cut flowers. They will flower again. Or, put other orchids in your garden for an annual show that will light up your winter days.

How to Make Your Orchid Last

Orchids like plenty of light, but not direct sunlight. Make sure the plant has a light spot, but do not put it in front of a south-facing window. Keep the temperature in the room between 15 and 25 degrees, and make sure the plant is not standing in a draught or too close to a heater. Give your orchid water every five to seven days.