How to plant an amaryllis bulb indoors

How to plant an amaryllis bulb indoors

Become a better gardener! Discover our new Almanac Garden Planner features forAlthough amaryllis can be purchased at any stage of development, for many, the real fun is growing the flower from a bulb. These big bulbs are easy to bring into bloom, and even a novice can expect success. Like daffodils or tulips, the amaryllis plant starts out as a bulb—often sold as part of a kit containing the bulb, a heavy pot, and some growing medium ideally, a sterile, soilless planting mix. They are naturally a spring-blooming bulb, producing flowers at some point between late winter and mid-spring February to April in the Northern Hemisphere.

Content:
  • How to Plant and Care for Amaryllis Flowers
  • Indoor Amaryllis Bulbs
  • How to Grow and Care for Amaryllis Flowers
  • How to Grow Amaryllis Indoors (The Perfect Winter Flower)
  • An Easy Guide to Growing Amaryllis
  • Amaryllis tips
WATCH RELATED VIDEO: How to Grow Amaryllis Bulbs Indoors

How to Plant and Care for Amaryllis Flowers

Growing an amaryllis requires no special skills. In fact, once a bulb is ready to bloom, it will flower with or without you! But here are a few tips that will help you get the best possible results from these impressive, winter-blooming bulbs. Shop around and purchase the biggest amaryllis bulbs you can find. Smaller bulbs will give you fewer stems and fewer blossoms. Keep in mind that some amaryllis varieties naturally produce smaller bulbs than others.

Plant some bulbs in late fall and plant the rest in early winter. After planting, be patient. It usually takes a month or two for the bulbs to wake up and begin growing.

Amaryllis have long stems and big flowers. A heavy pot with a wide base will help the plant stay upright. If you are planting several bulbs in one container they can be planted about an inch apart. Use a high-quality, sterile growing mix to avoid fungus gnats. Moisten the soil, fill the pot a little more than half full and set the bulb on top.

After you plant your bulbs, water well to help settle them into their pots. The first thing to emerge from the bulb is usually a bud. Leaves and additional stems will follow. Rotating the pot every few days will help keep the stems straight.

Depending on the size of the bulb, you can expect 1 to 3 stems, each with 3 to 5 flowers. All of the stems may come out at once, or they may emerge over a period of 2 to 3 weeks. As with all fresh flowers, cool temperatures will extend their life. Amaryllis also make excellent cut flowers. Cut the stems right before the buds are ready to open, and display them in a vase with greens or other seasonal blooms. Use scissors to clip off faded blossoms.

Once the stem has finished blooming, use a knife to to make a clean cut about 1" above the bulb. An amaryllis bulb costs no more than a supermarket bouquet. Yet many people find it hard to part with the bulb once the flowering season is over. If you wish, you can save the bulb and try getting it to bloom again next year.

When Will Your Amaryllis Bloom. Choose several different varieties to extend the show. Select the right pot and use good soil. Water sparingly. Make the most of the flowers.

Keep or toss the bulbs. Shop Amaryllis. Learn More:.


Indoor Amaryllis Bulbs

When someone mentions Amaryllis bulbs, you probably think of the bulbs that are part of holiday gift kits that include a bulb, a pot, and the growing medium. It may not have occurred to you that our mild Southern California climate is ideal for growing Amaryllis in the ground, too. You will want to learn about how to continue to enjoy this gorgeous bulb in your garden as a long-lasting perennial flowering plant. The Amaryllis is native to both Peru and South Africa.

Both the bulb and the plant are poisonous. Amaryllis bulbs are easy to force indoors. When planting an amaryllis bulb, select a pot that is.

How to Grow and Care for Amaryllis Flowers

Make a donation. Hippeastrum are popular gifts at Christmas. They are often commonly known as amaryllis and, by following a few easy tips, these beautiful flowers will bloom year after year for you. Bulbs should flower about six to eight weeks after planting, and should be planted from October to January. Hippeastrums can be propagated by seed or from bulb offsets. Seed-raised hippeastrums can take up to six years to reach maturity and flower. They will also usually differ from the parent plant. Propagation by offsets will produce a flowering bulb in three to four years, which will be identical to the parent plant.

How to Grow Amaryllis Indoors (The Perfect Winter Flower)

Amaryllis are bold, beautiful, easy-to-care-for houseplants that can illuminate a winter windowsill like no other. These vibrant winter bloomers come in over varieties of varying hues, with red and white being the most popular standouts. Such descriptions are very fitting if you have ever traced an amaryllis bulb through its life cycle and reaped the reward of its bloom. This spectacular blooming bulb is considered an indoor plant for potting in most regions; however, it is a perennial planting in much of the Southern Hemisphere. Amaryllis Bulbs have all that they need for growth and glorious blooms deep within their core.

Contact your local county Extension office through our County Office List. Amaryllis are popular houseplants with massive 6 to 10 inch trumpet shaped flowers and 1 to 2 foot tall stalks.

An Easy Guide to Growing Amaryllis

The amaryllis is a gorgeous flower with roots in Greek mythology. Amaryllis was a nymph who fell in love with a handsome shepherd named Alteo and sought to make him enamored with her. While the amaryllis is native to the Americas, today, the Netherlands is also a major exporter of these bulbs. Amaryllis flowers are absolutely stunning to look at. In fact, some amaryllis flowers have colors of green, yellow, orange, or even multiple colors.

Amaryllis tips

Growing an amaryllis requires no special skills. In fact, once a bulb is ready to bloom, it will flower with or without you! But here are a few tips that will help you get the best possible results from these impressive, winter-blooming bulbs. Shop around and purchase the biggest amaryllis bulbs you can find. Smaller bulbs will give you fewer stems and fewer blossoms. Keep in mind that some amaryllis varieties naturally produce smaller bulbs than others. Plant some bulbs in late fall and plant the rest in early winter.

Amaryllis bulbs produce huge trumpet-shaped flowers on the top of long strong stems and are indoor flowering bulbs. They are tender bulbs.

Amaryllis Hippeastrum spp. Department of Agriculture zones 7 to 8 or higher. While amaryllis bulbs are often forced indoors by planting in a sterile growing medium, bare root amaryllis bulbs can also be placed in glass containers filled with pebbles, stones or marbles for a showy display.

RELATED VIDEO: Amaryllis Done Blooming? Here's What to Do // Garden Answer

These beautiful tropical bulbs are actually in the family Hippeastrum. Flowering in fall or winter, they are often associated with Christmas. Care is easy, even though something this special looks like it should be difficult to grow; read on to see how easy it can be. Of course, our potted Amaryllis are ready to grow, but if you buy just a bulb it will need to be potted. As your Amaryllis will be top-heavy when in full bloom, we recommend using a heavy clay pot, preferably no more than an inch wider all around than the bulb itself.

Even though we live in Maine and soon it will be a frozen tundra around here, I still like to see a little green during the winter months. Some years I buy orchids in January or a house plant for a bit of color, other years I plant paperwhites or amaryllis bulbs just for the anticipation of being able to watch and wait for something to bloom.

NC State Extension no garantiza la exactitud del texto traducido. English is the controlling language of this page. To the extent there is any conflict between the English text and the translation, English controls. Clicking on the translation link activates a free translation service to convert the page to Spanish. As with any Internet translation, the conversion is not context-sensitive and may not translate the text to its original meaning. NC State Extension does not guarantee the accuracy of the translated text. A : There is a chance that you may receive an amaryllis for Christmas.

I always look forward to giving and receiving plants of the holiday season. One plant I would like to keep year-round is the amaryllis. Please explain how to do this.